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Origami for Mindfulness

Color and fold your way to inner peace with these 35 calming projects

Written by Mari Ono

Published: 20/09/2016

Origami for Mindfulness

  • Paperback
  •   |  
  • 9781782494058
  •   |  
  • Sep 2016
  •   |  
  • 128 pages

About the author

Mari Ono is an expert in origami and all forms of papercrafts. Born in Japan, she has lived in the United Kingdom for many years with her artist husband, Takumasa, where both work to promote Japanese art and crafts. Her previous books include The Simple Art of Japanese Papercrafts, published by North Light Books.

Roshin Ono came to the UK from Japan at the age of 7 with his mother and father. Now aged 14, he has participated in events introducing Japanese culture to the western world and has taught many children how to produce beautiful origami models.

Use mindful origami everyday with these 35 projects designed to destress, calm, and help you live in the moment.

The therapeutic effects of origami are well known in Japan and here Mari Ono—an expert in Japanese papercrafts—reveals how a few simple folds can reduce stress, improve concentration, and help overcome negativity.

By focusing on the experience of creating beautiful paper flowers, objects, animals, and more, this collection of 35 projects will guide you on a path to connectedness, awareness, and improved physical and emotional health. Not only that, the feelings of joy and satisfaction gained from completing a model will bring inner peace and help to redress emotional imbalances in our daily lives.

Origami is also the perfect tool for anyone interested in taking the first steps toward a mindful lifestyle—it is a very pure discipline where no expensive equipment is required and you can do it anywhere. To get you started, over 60 pieces of origami paper are provided, including a selection of sheets you can color in yourself—another activity proven to elicit a calming response in the body.