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  • Posted on June 22, 2017

    Fig and honey ricotta cheesecake recipe

    We are feeling the summer vibes this week, so we turned to our lovely book The Mediterranean Table for our recipe for the weekend. Using ricotta makes for a pleasantly light-textured cheesecake, combined with figs and honey to give that Mediterranean flavour. Serve it for dessert or enjoy it with coffee as a mid-morning treat.

    Fig and honey cheesecakeFig and honey ricotta cheesecake

     

    150 g/5 oz. digestive biscuits/ graham crackers

    50 g/3 ½ tablespoons butter, melted

    750 g/3 cups ricotta cheese

    2 eggs

    2 tablespoons runny honey

    1/2 teaspoon orange flower water

    40 g/1/3 cup plain/all-purpose flour

    6 fresh figs, halved

    20-cm/8-in. loose-based cake pan

    SERVES 6

     

    Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F) Gas 4.

    Using a rolling pin, crush the biscuits/ crackers into crumbs. Use a large bowl to mix the crumbs with the melted butter. Next, press this mixture firmly and evenly into the cake pan to form a base.

    In a separate large bowl, mix together the ricotta and eggs. Stir in the honey, orange flower water and flour. Spoon the ricotta mixture evenly across the biscuit base. Now, press the halved figs, skin-side down, into the ricotta mixture.

    Bake the cheesecake in the preheated oven for 50 minutes to 1 hour until set.

    Remove the pan from the oven and cool, then cover and chill until serving. The cheesecake will keep for a few days, covered, in the refrigerator.

     

    For more summer recipes, check out The Mediterranean Table.

    The Mediterranean Table

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, Recipes, Recipes, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with baking, recipe for the weekend, sweet, summer

  • Posted on June 20, 2017

    Find your interior style - Bathrooms

    So you're planning an interior style for your home, but what about the bathroom? Can you really bring your chosen style into such a functional room without having to fork out for a whole new en-suite. The answer is, yes you can!

    The Scandinavian HomeScandi

    Ok, so we're not all lucky enough to live somewhere where the weather is nice enough to have an outdoor shower, but the principals behind it are very Scandi and something you can bring into your own indoor bathroom. Think simplicity and nature. Find some simple accessories with natural colours and textures, such as the wooden stool in this image that almost looks likes driftwood, or the simple white and blue towels to create a feeling of uncluttered calm in your bathroom.

     

    urban pioneerIndustrial

    Just a few simple touches can bring the industrial look into your bathroom. The old school electric lights in this image are not only easy to source, but they won't cost you the earth and won't require any plumbing! Look out for industrial style fixtures such as taps or shower heads, if you want to get a feel for the style without having to redecorate!

     

    Coastal Living Coastal

    A coastal style bathroom is probably the easiest room to achieve this look without spending a fortune. We love the sky blue bathtub in this picture, but just by adding seaside themed accessories you can easily transform your bathroom into a coastal dream. The jars of shells and pebbles in this picture are a subtle nod to the beach, but you could always go brighter and bolder - think beach huts, stripes and sunshine yellows.

     

    urban pioneerBotanical

    It's so easy to create your botanical bathroom, just add plants! You don't even need lots of plants to make an impact; against this white background the green fern stands out instantly. Go for tropical plants as they are used to the humidity. If you have plenty of light go for succulents, such as aloe. If you are lacking natural light, go for ferns and air plants.

     

    perfect english cottageCountry

    Again, you can create a country style bathroom with some simple accessories and fixtures. Even if you don't have a claw-foot bath, like the one in the image, the gold, traditional tap fixtures create the country style feel, coupled with the water jug and distressed wooden cupboard and shelving.

     

    For more interior inspiration, check out the featured book, (listed in order):

    The Scandinavian Home by Niki Brantmark

    The Scandinavian Home by Niki Brantmark

    Urban Pioneer by Sara Emslie

    Urban Pioneer by Sara Emslie

    Coastal Living by Henrietta Heald

    Coastal Living by Henrietta Heald

    Perfect English Cottage by Ros Byam Shaw

    Perfect English Cottage by Ros Byam Shaw

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with interiors, homestyle, industrial, botanical, country, coastal, scandi, bathrooms

  • Posted on June 15, 2017

    Beer Soda Bread recipe

    Granted, dad's can be tricky to buy for, so this Father's Day, why not bake something for him instead? But we're not thinking cupcakes, we're thinking a delicious loaf of beer soda bread, especially as the 15th of June is National Beer Day!

    We've included the recipes for a sweet and a savoury version, so whether you're making bacon and eggs for breakfast in bed, a killer sandwich for a special lunch or simply toasting and covering with jam, this loaf is the perfect way to say 'thanks dad!' this weekend!

    beer soda breadBeer Soda Bread

    Soda bread is the quickest and easiest loaf to put together if you want some bread to go with dinner or, even better, to go with cheese and meats. The basic recipe is also ideal for experimenting with different beers and other ingredients, especially as it’s a forgiving loaf that doesn’t need the same kind of care as a yeast-risen bread. I have two favorite versions: one savory (Cheese, Onion, and Porter) and the other sweet (Dried Fruit and Dubbel).

     

    2 cups (250g) wholewheat (wholemeal) flour, plus extra for dusting

    1 teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon baking soda (bicarbonate of soda)

    1 tablespoon honey

    2⁄3 cup (150ml) beer

    1⁄3 cup (100ml) buttermilk or natural yogurt

    Plus your selection of additional ingredients (see below)

    Preheat the oven to 400ºF/200ºC/Gas 6.

    Makes 1 loaf

     

    Mix all the dry ingredients in one bowl and all the wet ingredients in another. Then pour the wet ingredients into the dry ones, and mix together well, eventually using your hands to form the mixture into a bread dough.

    Knead the dough for a few minutes on a floured work surface, shape into a round loaf, and place on a baking tray. Score a large cross in the top of the loaf. Bake in the oven for around 45 minutes. To check if the bread is ready, turn the loaf over and tap the base—if it’s done, it’ll sound hollow.

     

    Recipe Variations...

    Cheese, Onion, and Porter

    Add 3/4 cup (75g) grated Cheddar cheese to the bread dough (reserving some to sprinkle on top of the loaf). Use some Porter for the beer element. Finely chop some rings of red onion and arrange them on top of the loaf before baking. Finally, sprinkle with a few sprigs of rosemary to serve.

    Dried Fruit and Dubbel

    Into the dough, add 1/2 cup (75g) of mixed dried fruit and a teaspoon each of ground cinnamon and ground nutmeg. Use a Belgian Dubbel as the beer. Sprinkle some brown sugar over the top of the loaf before baking.

     

    For more beer inspired recipes, check out Cooking with Beer by Mark Dredge.

    Cooking with Beer by Mark Dredge

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, Recipes, Recipes, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with bread, baking, recipe for the weekend, recipe, gift ideas, father's day

  • Posted on June 13, 2017

    Find your interior style - Living Spaces

    What kind of interior style suits you best? Bright botanical or calming coastal? Simple Scandi or classic country? This week we're looking at living spaces to help you pick your own interior style.

    The Scandinavian homeScandi

    Whilst most of us won't get the impressive view that goes with this Scandi Style living room, you can still get the look with lots of natural fabrics, such as wool and sheep skin rugs, coupled with the natural textures and colours of wooden paneling.

     

    botanical styleIndustrial

    We love the colours in the bare walls in this industrial style living room, just going to show that you don't need to paint to add colour to a room. The quirky light adds to the industrial effect, while the plants bring some life to the room to balance it out and make it feel more homely.

     

    Coastal Living Coastal

    Again, a bright, white room for this coastal style living space, with subtle little nods to the sea like the model sailboat in the corner, or the blue and white striped pillow on the sofa. The colours brought into the room are all natural and reflect the colours you would find on the seaside.

     

    botanical styleBotanical

    Going botanical style doesn't always have to mean going green! While this living space has lots of green plants, the vibrant blue wall provides a striking backdrop, creating a very tropical, colourful vibe.

     

    perfect english cottageCountry

    The exposed wooden beams, roaring fire and cosy, comfortable furniture make this a classic country living room. While this picture is of a very traditional country cottage, you can modernize it with brighter colours and less contrasting patterns, as long as you keep the comfy, homely vibe that a country interior needs!

     

    For more interior inspiration, check out the featured books (listed in order):

    The Scandinavian Home by Niki Brantmark

    The Scandinavian Home by Niki Brantmark

    Botanical Style by Selina Lake

    Botanical Style by Selina Lake

    Coastal Living by Henrietta Heald

    Coastal Living by Henrietta Heald

    Perfect English Cottage by Ros Byam Shaw

    Perfect English Cottage by Ros Byam Shaw

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with interiors, industrial, home design, botanical, country, coastal, scandi

  • Posted on June 9, 2017

    Crab, chilli & lemon pasta recipe

    This is such a simple dish, but special enough that you could easily serve it at a dinner party! Second to the carbonara, this is the other most popular pasta served at Laura Santtini's restaurant. This recipe is loved because it is light, clean, fresh and super tasty.

    Crab Linguine pasta secrets

    Crab, chilli & lemon pasta

    200 g/7 oz. dried pasta

    200 g/7 oz. cooked picked white crabmeat*

    a handful of flat leaf parsley

    4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus extra if needed

    grated zest and freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon

    2 garlic cloves, squashed, peeled and halved lengthways

    1 red chilli/chile, deseeded and finely chopped

    salt and freshly ground black pepper

    * You can use half white crabmeat and half brown for a fuller crab flavour.

    SERVES 2

     

    Cook the pasta in a pan of salted boiling water according to the packet instructions.

    Meanwhile, combine all the remaining ingredients in a bowl. This is a fairly loose sauce; therefore add extra olive oil if it is too dry and season with salt and pepper.

    Drain the pasta but keep a cup of the cooking water.

    Tip the hot drained pasta back into the pan, add the crab mixture and a small splash of the retained pasta cooking water. Toss with gusto until creamy and well combined.

    Serve immediately.

    TASTY TOPPER Diced avocado and mango

     

    For more delicious pasta recipes, check out Laura Santtini's Pasta Secrets.

    Laura Santtini's Pasta Secrets

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, Recipes, Recipes, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with savoury, recipe for the weekend, quick, pasta, seafood

  • Posted on June 8, 2017

    Find your interior style - Kitchens

    With so many different interiors styles to choose from, it can be tricky to know which one to go for when designing your home. To help you decide, we've put together some examples of our favourite interior styles, from the trending Scandi style to classic country homes. All you have to do is pick your favourite and start decorating! This week - kitchens!

    The Scandinavian home - kitchenScandi

    Scandi interiors are all about clean and de-cluttered spaces, often using lots of wood and natural finishes. With lots of natural light and light colours, a Scandi kitchen will be a simple but striking room.

     

    urban pioneer - kitchenIndustrial

    The industrial interior style is all about keeping the natural building materials of a room exposed. For a kitchen, this could mean exposed piping, bare floors or wooden panels. It will often be a clean, stripped back room with access to lots of natural light to make it feel bright and open.

     

    Coastal Living kitchenCoastal

    For a coastal style kitchen, think of a cross between Scandi and country. Lots of wood and light, bright colours. You're trying to bring the colours of the seaside into your home, so go for a balance of blues and whites and light wooden surfaces.

     

    Botanical Style kitchenBotanical

    Botanical style does what it says on the tin. If you love to bring the outdoors in then this is the style for you. Whether you go for tropical flowers and bright patterns, or lots of green foliage it's all about filling each room with nature inspired patterns, plants and accessories.

     

    perfect english cottage kitchenCountry

    A classic country kitchen is one of the cosiest places to be in a home! Flagstone floors, a big wooden table everyone can sit around, perhaps a selection of snoozing dogs and cats, it really is the heart of every country house.

     

    For more interior inspiration, check out the featured books (listed in order):

    The Scandinavian Home by Niki Brantmark

    The scandinavian home

    Urban Pioneer by Sara Emslie

    urban pioneer

    Coastal Living by Henrietta Heald

    Coastal Living

    Botanical Style by Selina Lake

    Botanical Style

    Perfect English Cottage by Ros Byam Shaw

    Perfect English Cottage

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with inspiration, interiors, industrial, style, botanical, country, coastal, scandi

  • Posted on May 31, 2017

    Piña Colada recipe

    Hello June! We admit that we may be a little early, but we couldn’t resist sharing with you this recipe for a summer cocktail classic from The Curious Bartender’s new book, Rum Revolution…

    Pina Colada Rum Revolution

    If it were possible to bottle the concentrated flavour of a holiday by the beach, it would probably taste something like a Piña Colada. Little wonder that sunscreen manufacturers borrow the classic combination of pineapple and coconut to aromatize their products. Hell, the Piña Colada even looks like a holiday, and a lazy one at that – quietly content as it wallows in its cool and gloopy state, all ludicrous in its bulging proportions and ostentatious garnishing. If Piña Colada were a vehicle, it would be a carnival float. If it were a person, it would lounge by the pool in a skin-tight, leopard-print swimming thong to match its day-glow tan and moustache. There are only two types of people in the world: those who love a Piña Colada, and those who don’t admit to loving them.

    The good news is that it’s laughably easy to make, and requires only three ingredients (rum, coconut milk and pineapple juice), along with ice and a blender. Of course, if you have access to a “slushy” machine, all the better. That’s how they make them these days at Barrachina, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the drink was purportedly invented. Hordes of tourists rock up to this joint every day, and the staff rapidly churn out the cocktail at the peculiarly exacting price of $7.81 (£6.30) a piece. The drink’s inventor – Ramón Portas Mingot – created it at Barrachina in 1963, although that recipe also included condensed milk. Like most drinks, the claim is contested, by another Ramón as it happens: Ramón Marrero. He was allegedly working at San Juan’s Caribe Hilton in 1954 when he created the drink. One thing that both gentlemen can agree on is that the inventor was called Ramón.

    The creation of the drink was only made possible thanks to the arrival of the Coco López brand of coconut cream, launched in Puerto Rico in 1948. The Piña Colada is now the national drink of Puerto Rico and is celebrated on National Piña Colada day, on July 10. The classic Piña Colada formula calls for light rum, pineapple juice and cream of coconut. It’s too sweet and too light on the rum to my tastes, so I suggest using a combination of light and dark rums, and cutting back on the pineapple slightly.

    For bonus points, you can “pimp your piña” by popping the sealed can of coconut milk in a pressure cooker set to maximum temperature for an hour or so. This kickstarts Maillard (browning) reactions, as the sugars and enzymes go to work on each other, which results in a toasted, biscuity, almost buttery, coconut milk that makes the normal stuff seem bland. Don’t skimp on the pineapple juice, make sure you buy the best stuff you can find and sweeten according to your taste, which for me means barely sweetening at all.

    Piña Colada

    25 ml/1 fl . oz. Don Q Cristal White

    25 ml/1 fl . oz. Bacardi 8-year-old

    50 ml/1.⁄ 2/3 fl . oz. Pressure-cooked coconut milk (can be substituted for the regular stuff)

    60 ml/2 fl . oz. pressed pineapple juice

    10 ml/2 teaspoons lime juice

    0.5 g/pinch of salt

    Add all the ingredients to a blender along with 100 g/3 ½ oz. of ice (per serving). Blitz it for a good 30 seconds, or until it’s silky smooth and lump-free. Serve immediately in a hurricane glass (you know the one, it’s like an elongated wine glass with a short stem).

     

    This extract and recipe is from The Curious Bartender's Rum Revolution by Tristan Stephenson.

    Rum Revolution by Trsitan Stephenson

    Photography by Addie Chinn ©Ryland Peters & Small

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, Recipes, Recipes, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with drinks, recipe for the weekend, cocktail, summer

  • Posted on May 30, 2017

    Inspirational outdoor spaces

    From a humble patio to the downright luxurious, we've got together some of our favourite outdoor spaces...

    coastal living

    bold and bright

    bold and bright

    coastal living

    coastal living

    The Mediterranean Table

     

    These photographs have been taken from:

    Bold and Bright by Maria S Teixeira

    Coastal Living by Henrietta Heald

    Coastal Living

    The Mediterranean Table

    The Mediterranean Table

    All photography is ©Ryland Peters & Small

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with interiors, outdoor living, summer

  • Posted on May 25, 2017

    Smoky pork belly with mustard slaw recipe

    Whether there’s rain or shine, we’ll be getting our summer BBQ spirit on this weekend with this pork belly and mustard slaw recipe! If you’re looking for something a bit more special than your normal burger and hot-dogs, this is sure to impress, plus it’s a perfect recipe to make in advance if you have lots of guests. The smoky sauce it is cooked in works well smothered on roast root veg or chicken, and any leftovers taste amazing in a wrap. Although this recipe is cooked in the oven, you could always finish it off on the BBQ for an extra smoky flavour (weather permitting)!

    Pork belly perfectly PaleoSmoky Pork Belly with Mustard Slaw

    4 pork belly cuts (on the bone)

    Mustard Slaw (see below), to serve

    smoky sauce

    1 red onion, roughly chopped

    4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced

    4 heaped tablespoons tomato purée/paste

    4 tablespoons pure maple syrup

    2 tablespoons white wine vinegar

    1 tablespoon black strap molasses or treacle

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    a few dashes of liquid coconut aminos, to taste

    freshly squeezed juice of ½ lemon

    chilli powder and smoked paprika, to taste

    salt and black pepper, to season

    SERVES 4

     

    Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) Gas 6.

    To prepare the pork belly, score the skin and rub sea salt all over. Lay in a roasting pan with the skin facing up, making sure the edges don’t touch the sides or you won’t get proper crackling. Roast in the preheated oven for 20 minutes.

    While the pork is in the oven prepare the smoky sauce. Add all the ingredients to a saucepan and set over low–medium heat. Cook for a few minutes until the onions and garlic are cooked. Then use a handheld electric blender to blend all the ingredients with enough water to bind them together.

    Remove the pork from the oven and baste with the oil that has been released from it. Pour any excess oil out of the pan and reserve for use in another recipe.

    Turn the heat down to 170°C (325°F) Gas 3 and return the pork to cook for a further 20 minutes. Brush the pork with a generous amount of sauce so every ‘rib belly’ is covered but you still have about half of the mixture.

    Cook for 25 minutes more, brushing over with more sauce towards the end. Remove the pork from the oven and brush over a little extra sauce if needed. Keep any remaining sauce in a sterilized glass jar in the fridge. Enjoy the ribs with the mustard slaw on the side or shred the meat off the bone and layer up in a wrap with a mound of slaw on top.

    Mustard Slaw

    1 kohlrabi (or turnip), grated or very thinly sliced

    1 head of broccoli, grated or very thinly sliced

    1 carrot, grated or very thinly sliced

    1 celery stalk/rib, thinly sliced

    ¼ red or white cabbage, grated or very thinly sliced freshly squeezed juice of 1/2 lemon

    olive oil, to drizzle

    1–2 teaspoons wholegrain mustard, to taste

    SERVES 2–4

    Put all of the grated or sliced vegetables in a large mixing bowl and squeeze over the lemon juice. Mix well then drizzle with olive oil and stir in a little mustard. Taste, adding more mustard if you like, season with salt and pepper and set aside. For a creamier slaw use mayonnaise instead of oil.

     

    This recipe is from Perfectly Paleo by Rosa Rigby

    Perfectly Paleo by Rosa Rigby

    Photography by Mowie Kay ©Ryland Peters & Small

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, Recipes, Recipes, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with savoury, bank holiday, bbq, recipe for the weekend, paleo

  • Posted on May 24, 2017

    5 indoor gardening projects

    With the Chelsea Flower Show taking place this week, we're feeling inspired to do some gardening, but without lots of outdoor space we've turned to Isabelle Palmer for some great indoor gardening projects that anyone can do! So if you're visiting the show, or have already visited and need some indoor gardening inspiration, or even if you'd just love to have more flowers and plants in your home but you're not sure where's best to start, take a look at these 5 projects from The Balcony Gardener...

    Bowl of Succulents House PlantsBowl of Succulents

    This stylish display is a must for the “I wish I had more time!” gardener, the “I always forget to water the plants” gardener, or simply the lazy gardener. In recent years, succulents have come out of the shadows and they can be seen regularly on the tables of trendy cafes and in the pages of hip interior design magazines. The odd shapes, the fleshy leaves, and the sculptural globes make very modern and stylish interior plants. They are minimalist, with simple, streamlined shapes, and easily add a “desert chic” look to any home.

    It can be a lot of fun putting together a display of succulents—you can definitely include the weird and the wonderful here. I chose a selection of my favorites, including Crassula ovata (jade or money plant), Sempervivum tectorum (common houseleek or hens-and-chicks), Aloe “Pinto,” Sedum, Kalanchoe thyrsifl ora (paddle plant), Epipremnum aureum (devil’s ivy), Echeveria “Fred Ives,” Crassula perforata (string of buttons), and Pachyveria glauca “Little Jewel,” along with Lithops (living stones or stone plant) and neutral pebbles. I painted the bowl a dark slate color, which I think offsets the overall look very well.

     

    Herb Wooden Crates House PlantsFrench Herb Container

    What could be more satisfying than reaching over and picking some fresh, home-grown rosemary to use with your Sunday roast lamb? Parisians and other apartment dwellers living in mainland European cities are often starved of outdoor space, so they make the most of their balconies and indoor planting areas. Walking through the streets of Paris and looking up to the sky, you will often see apartments lined with window boxes and lushly planted balconies. The rustic-looking crate is perfect for the herbs housed inside, creating a picturesque miniature French herb garden. You can often find wooden crates in vintage and antiques stores; sometimes, you might spot a neglected one at the back of the store, containing other bits and pieces—they’re often cheap and you can haggle with the seller!

    The compact thyme bushes look great in this crate. Thyme can be grown successfully indoors; it simply needs a bright windowsill and some basic care and attention to thrive. The heady scent emanating from rosemary is delicious, and this highly fragrant herb can be used in many dishes. It is very easy to grow and, being a Mediterranean herb, it will appreciate a sunny spot. Finally, the lavender plant makes a lovely partner for both the thyme and the rosemary. Lavender is hard to resist, boasting beautiful flowers and an equally arresting scent. It gives a delicate flavor to cooking and is especially wonderful in light desserts.

     

    Summer floral arrangement house plantsSummer Floral Arrangement

    Flower-arranging is often regarded as a rather staid and old-fashioned hobby. However, there has recently been a noticeable resurgence in floral arrangements, with edgier displays featuring wilder flowers that are markedly different from commercial blooms. This bountiful floral display, which includes roses, peonies, delphiniums, Salvia farinacea (ornamental sage), Chamelaucium uncinatum (Geraldton waxflower), and Brodiaea (cluster lilies), is bright and colorful, and housed perfectly in a white kitchen jug. The eclectic mix of color and foliage makes for a lovely contrast with the pale hues of the open kitchen.

     

    Mason Jar containers House PlantsMason Jar Containers

    These three vintage preserving jars are perfect for a kitchen display of indoor plants. Terrarium-style planters need not be expensive, since the plants don’t need to be housed in antique cases or terrariums commissioned from a specialist maker. In fact, it’s more fun to think outside the box and be imaginative. So, visit antiques stores, flower markets, and thrift stores, or look in your own home—are there any jars or vases that you’ve always kept but never found a use for?

    When I found the jars I was on vacation close to the coast, so I have kept that lovely feeling and can remind myself of walks on the beach by using golden sand as a base for the plants. Succulents grow very well in sand; simply place a spoonful or two of succulent potting mix in the base of the jar, then sprinkle the sand around the sides and over the top to hide the potting mix. I used reindeer moss in all three jars and picked different glossy succulents, including Crassula ovata (jade or money plant), which is one of my favorites. Other succulents you could use include Schlumbergera (Christmas cactus), Sempervivum tectorum (common houseleek or, rather charmingly, hens-and-chicks), and Kalanchoe tomentosa (panda plant). Spend some time looking into your preferred succulents and thinking about which colors would work best in your own kitchen. Water your succulents sparingly.

     

    ivy and fern hanging basket house plantsIvy and Fern Hanging Basket

    Hanging arrangements are a wonderfully creative way to display indoor plants. They create a fabulous point of interest in a living room, above a long table in a kitchen, or displayed in a hallway. This arrangement features lush, green, trailing Hedera (ivy) and busy Nephrolepis exaltata (Boston fern), both typically outdoor plants. This bountiful hanging basket makes a wonderful contrast to the crisp white surroundings of the room.

     

    These projects are from House Plants by Isabelle Palmer.

    house plants by Isabelle Palmer

    Photography by Helen Cathcart ©CICO Books

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    This post was posted in Featured, Featured, News, News, UK, US, What's new, What's new and was tagged with interiors, plants, flowers, indoor gardening, projects

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